On the moors – before the heat arrived

Much of July was sunny with little rain so it was a good time to get up onto Anglezarke and take a route over the blanket bog that covers the moor while the peat was dry and springy rather than a boggy morass. So the Saturday after my mid week walk in the Peak District I decided to do just that. We’d been warned of a heat wave coming in with some very high (for the UK!) temperatures which wouldn’t be conducive for walking, so it seemed sensible to get out before it arrived.

I parked up at Rivington and then cut across the meadow to Sheep House Lane, walking a short distance down the tarmac past the Tea Room (it was too soon in the walk to take advantage) before turning on to the path across the fields
and beside the small brook (the path which had been damaged by the Spring storms had been repaired) and then up the track towards Dean Wood
Climbing over the stile I took the path across the fields towards Allance Bridge
Looking down to Yarrow Reservoir I could se that the water level was very low
This was the view down to the water from Allance Bridge. I can’t recall seeing the water level that low .
Looking over the other side of the bridge, this was the state of the inlet where the Yarrow usually enters the reservoir – it’s usually full of water and the River seemed to be reduced to a trickle.
After crossing the bridge I turned up the path across the fields from Parson’s Bullough
Eventually reaching the track from Jepson’s Gate. Rather than turn right here and follow the track towards Lead Mine Clough I turned left towards Jepson’s Gate
Joining the minor road I turned right and after a short distance I wnt through a gate and crossed onto the open access land. There was a hint of a path which soon petered out so I had to make my way across the rough and tufty ground. Luckily after the dry few weeks the ground was firm underfoot, otherwise I would have been doing some bog hopping!
Looking west over to Healey Nab (In my teens I used to live just over the other side of this modest hill) to Chorley
I carried on across the moor eventually joining the path for Hurst Hill. I turned off onto the path towards Grain Pole Hill
Looking north from the summit of Grain Pole Hill
My next objective – Hurst Hill. I retraced my steps and then joined the path towards the summit.
Reaching the summit. Good views all round
Looking towards Great Hill
across to Redmond and Spitler’s Edges
and, to the south, Winter Hill and Rivington Pike
I carried on across the path across the peat towards the prehistoric burial mound, Round Loaf. This can be a quagmire but the peat was largely dry and springy underfoot wit just the occasional muddy patch. With the peat so dry there’s a real risk it could be set on fire by a barbecue or carelessly disposed fag end. But it was quiet with not many people around.
Last time I was up here the moor was covered with “bog cotton” (Cotton Grass) but there were only a few patches left on the wetter sections of the peat.
I stopped for a bite to eat and to soak up the views on the top of Round Loaf
Before setting off along the path across the moor towards Great Hill
Looking north across the moor
Some more bog cotton – a warning to avoid a boggy section!
Reaching the bottom of Great Hill I decided against climbing to the top of the familiar summit but turned right taking the flagged path towards Redmond’s Edge. I’ve no idea who “Redmond” was or what the name means and have drawn a blank searching on the web.
Reaching Redmond’s Edge, rather than carrying on along the path over Spitler’s Edge and on to Horden Stoops, I turned west down the path I’d walked up from the opposite direction a few weeks before. It’s not marked on the OS map but there’s a clear path to follow these days.
Carrying on down the path. I can’t remember the grass on the moor looking so green. Strange, considering the dry conditions of late.
Continuing along the path, which eventually joins the main track across the moor from Belmont Road to Lead Mine Clough
At Hempshaws I took the path toward the ruined farm known as Old Rachel’s
The view over to the Edges from Old Rachel’s where I stopped for a short break
Carrying on along the path I passed the waymarker that had been erected by the Peak and Northern Footpath Society
Looking south towards Winter Hill and Noon Hill

I turned south continuing along the path until I reached the Belmont Road near to Moses Cockers. After a short stretch of tarmac (fortunately not too many vehicles encountered – it can be a bit of a race track this road, especially for motorcyclists) I turned off and followed the paths back to my car.

It was a fine, warm day on the Saturday but the temperature was just right for walking. It certainly wasn’t for the next few days as the promised heat wave arrived. More a time for sitting in the shade in the garden with an iced drink which is exactly what I did!

12 thoughts on “On the moors – before the heat arrived

  1. I was with you every step of the way there. A good circuit and, as you say, better when the moors are dry. I shall give that route a go some time. 👍🙂

  2. That was a good walk, I’m cream crackered now after that 🙂 I was keeping my fingers crossed during the heatwave that Winter Hill wouldn’t go up in flames again – so far so good.

    • I didn’t feel like doing much at all for a couple of days. You were lucky to avoid it. Looking forward to reading about your trip to Lewis. I’d love to go back.

  3. It’s been pretty dry and hot down here the past few weeks so I haven’t been out on the hills all that much. That and the dreaded COVID has entered our lives again, fortunately just mild symptoms for me and Mrs SnS and the kids don’t seem to have picked it up

  4. Lovely walk, very wise to have avoided that hot weather. I tried the odd evening walk to stay out of the worse of the heat, luckily down here we had a sea breeze throughout the really hot stuff which helped a bit

    • It was definitely way too hot to consider getting out for a energetic walk. A sea breeze would have been nice, though. I think it was worse down your way

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