Last day in Haarlem

Our flight home at the end of our short holiday didn’t leave Schipol until after 7 o’clock, so we had more a less a full day before we got the bus to the airport. I had a wander along the canal first thing before we had to leave our little house.

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We dropped our bags at our daughter’s work, went for a coffee and then had a wander round town, mooching round the pleasant shopping streets. There was a small market on in the Botermarkt

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After grabbing a bite to eat we decided to visit Sint Bavo, the Grote Kerk. We’d been inside before a couple of years ago but decided we’d like another look round. There’s an entry fee, but it’s quite reasonable.

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We caught the end of one of the regular organ recitals held in massive Gothic building. Installed in 1738, the organ is huge – it covers the whole west wall of the church and is almost 30 metres high. It’s something of a tourist attraction in it’s own right and has been played by Handel and Mozart.

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The floor of the church is covered with gravestones. We spotted the grave of Pieter Teyler, who left the money for the museum that bears his name.

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Afterwards we wandered down to the river to meet son and daughter by the windmill – they’d been spending the last afternoon together.

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We walked back to the Grote Markt and had a final drink (mint tea!) then it was time to pick up our bags and say goodbye.

We’d had a good little holiday in Haarlem and the weather had been kind – much better than we’d expected from the weather forecast we’d seen before we arrived. The week had just disappeared and it’s not easy to leave your daughter behind, even if she is grown up 😦 We’re planning to go back for Christmas – providing we can find somewhere suitable to stay. And now we’re just about coming to the end of summer that’s not so long off.

Haarlem Jazz

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Our visit to Haarlem coincided with the annual Jazz Festival which started on the Wednesday and ran through until Sunday. We’d hoped to catch some of the music on the Wednesday and Thursday before we headed for home on Friday. On Wednesday evening, however, it poured down more or less continuously so after spending some time watching one of the acts on the opening night, we decided to call it quits and retreated to Tierney’s bar! The next night was much better. It didn’t rain and we were able to sample some of the music and atmosphere.

On the Wednesday there was only one stage, set up in the Grote Markt, but the next night three more stages opened up. 2 other stages around the Grote Kerk – on Oude Groenmarkt and Klokhuisplein – and another venue at the Pletterij , on the outskirts of the town centre.

From what we saw there wasn’t much jazz being played at the Jazz festival, which is why it’s actually billed as Haarlem Jazz and more. On Thursday the main stage was occupied by a couple of performers playing / performing electronic dance music, which is very big in the Netherlands. Not my scene at all, but clearly loved by the audience of mainly young adults.

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The other two stages around the Grote Kerk seemed to be devoted to soul music. Looking at the programme the “real” jazz seemed to be playing at the Pletterij .

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Soul Six on the Klokhuisplein stage
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We spent most of our time listening to a band on the smaller stage in the on Oude Groenmarkt . Uncle Sue are a local band and with a female singer and a horn section who were performing Stax style soul music. They were a good live act and much more up my street!

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A walk among the dunes

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As we were leaving Amsterdam on the Wednesday it started to rain, and when it rains in the Netherlands it really rains! It continued for the rest of the evening, which meant we didn’t hang around long to watch the start of the Haarlem Jazz festival that evening. (It was OK the next evening, though). The next morning seemed a little mixed but my son and I decided to risk it and took the bus to the Nationaal Park Zuid-Kennemerland, an area of sand dunes to the west of Haarlem .

The Connexxion, line 81 bus for Zandvoort from Haarlem train station took about 20 minutes to reach the Visitor Centre. There’s a number of marked walking and cycling trails that start from there. As we weren’t sure about the weather we decided to follow the green trail

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The dunes are the nearest you’ll come to hills in this part of the Netherlands!

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After a short while we came to Het Wed, a freshwater lake popular for swimming. There’s a good stretch of sand too and toilet and showering facilities. I reckon it would be a popular spot for families on a sunny day. But as it was cool and overcast only a few hardy souls were braving the water.

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Het Wed
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We carried on, taking a short diversion off the green route to climb up to a viewpoint, where we could just make out the sea in the distance..

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On our way back to the Visitor Centre we passed some memorial stones. We stopped to take a closer look.

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During the Nazi occupation members of the Resistance captured by the Nazis were taken to the dunes to be executed and were buried there. In May 1945, after the occupiers had retreated a search of the dunes found 422 bodies in 45 locations. After they were identified the bodies were reburied and the granite headstones have been placed above their graves. 347 of the victims, inlcuding Hannie Schaft , the “Girl with the Red Hair”, are buried in Erebegraafplaats Bloemendaal, a cemetery in the dunes. The rest are buried in nine graves which are marked by the gravestones which record how many murdered resistance members are buried in the immediate vicinity. We passed two of them. We stopped for a short while to pay our respects and placed a small stone on top of the headstone.

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This stone tells that 92 people are buried in the vicinity

Moving on we saw some wild ponies having a snack. Ponies, deer, highland cattle and bison roam in parts of the reserve.

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We were quite lucky. Although it was overcast we had some sunny spells and there was only one, very brief, heavy downpour. By the time we’d taken our cagoules out of our backpack and put them on it had passed over!

I could have spent longer wandering around the dunes and next time we’re in Haarlem if the weather is good enough I’d like to walk the longer blue route trail which goes over to the sea shore and also pay my respects at the cemetery and some of the other monuments.

Teylers Museum

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During our previous visits to Haarlem, we’ve passed the entrance to the Teylers Museum, which stands on the Spaarn embankment, many times, but I’d never visited.

Open to the public since 1784, it was the first museum in the Netherlands. It was founded after the death of Pieter Teyler van der Hulst (1702-1778) a successful silk merchant and financier who had a wide range of interests in the arts and sciences. In his will, Teyler left two million guilders (roughly 80 million euros) to establish a foundation, to promote theology, the sciences, and the arts.  In 1779, the Foundation’s first directors commissioned the young architect Leendert Viervant to design a ‘Books and Art Room’ behind the Foundation House (Fundatiehuis, where Pieter Teyler had lived). The result was the Oval Room, which is still the heart of the museum, although the premises have been expanded considerably since then. In fact, it’s rather like the Tardis. It doesn’t look so big from the outside but once you’re inside there’s a whole series of interconnected rooms and a whole new extension which, from the outside, you wouldn’t know were there.

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By Teylers Museum, Haarlem, the Netherlands, CC BY-SA 3.0 nl, Link

It’s quite an amazing place. In many ways it’s an old fashioned museum with lots of exhibits, including fossils, minerals, coins and scientific instruments, many in glass display cases. There’s also two galleries of paintings and a large collection of drawings and prints by artists including Michelangelo, Raphael, and  Rembrandt. The building itself is also fascinating. We spent a couple of hours looking round but there’s really too much to see during one visit.

Visitors are provided with an audio guide which provides information on selected exhibits by entering a number. For this summer the audio guide also includes an introductory tour, a “radio play” based on Napoleon’s visit to the museum in 1811 which focused on the history of the museum and key exhibits.

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We followed the “Napoleon tour”, which took about half an hour, and then had a more detailed look around, concentrating on particular areas of interest.

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Just a few of the large collection of fossils
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Humanoid skulls and bones
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Fluorescent minerals
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The large electrostatic generator. They had smaller examples to see as well.

The Oval room was one of the highlights. Originally this was the whole museum! It’s lit only by natural light that comes in through the skylights – so it’s probably best to visit on a bright summer’s day!

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It was difficult to get a shot that really shows off the room, so I resorted to embedding a picture from Wikipedia which was taken from the balcony, which isn’t accessible to the public.

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By Teylers Museum, Haarlem, the Netherlands, CC BY-SA 3.0 nl, Link (source: Wikipedia)

A painting in one of the art galleries shows what the room looked like in 1800, with the large electrostatic generator in the centre.

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A large horseshoe magnet supporting 100 kg
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An early electric battery
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An astronomical globe

The two art galleries were also lit by natural light

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The collection mainly features works from the Dutch Romantic School and the later Hague School and Amsterdam Impressionists.

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Wintergezicht met Schaatsers (1864) by Johan Barthold Jongkind
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De Molen (1899) by Jan Hendrik Weissenbruch
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Twee dienstboden op een Amsterdamse brug bij avond (1890) George Hendrik Breitner
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Trommelslaagster (c 1908) by Isaac Israels

Like many other galleries and museums in the Netherlands there was a temporary exhibition marking 250 years since the death of Rembrandt. It featured prints by the master and some of his contemporaries.

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As usual, I was bowled over by the beauty and the amazing detail of Rembrandt’s tiny prints. One of them had been blown up and covered the whole of one wall. Even on such a large scale the detail was amazing.

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And this was the real thing, which, even though it is the largest of his landscape prints, was not even as big as an A3 sheet of paper

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The newest part of the museum, an exhibition hall and a cafe, were built in 1996 and are airy, cantilevered spaces on two sides of a “secret” courtyard / garden.

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It was time for some refreshment!

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the Dutch know how to make mint tea!

We’d spent more than a couple of hours in the museum so had a last look around before returning our audio guides and leaving the building to meet up with our son and daughter, who’s been spending some time together.

Teylers is an excellent museum and I suspect we’ll be paying a visit another time when we next visit Haarlem.

Back to Haarlem

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Last week we were back in Haarlem, to visit our daughter while taking a few days break. As usual, we managed to pack a lot into the week – spending some time exploring the small, historic city, watching some live music acts (the Haarlem Jazz Festival started towards the end of our little holiday), taking in some art in Amsterdam and even managing a short walk on the dunes.

We caught the plane from Manchester. Unfortunately there was a dealy which meant we were sat on the plane for over an hour and a half before it took off. Not the greatest experience, but it could have been worse. So we arrived in Haarlem a couple of hours late. It’s quite easy to get to the city by catching the Number 300 bis that runs from Schipol airport to the train station in Haarlem, a 40 minute journey with buses about every 10 minutes during the daytime. We’d rented a house a few minutes walk from the station, so after picking up the keys we were soon settled in.

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The next morning we spent the morning wandering around Haarlem. The Single canal was just a couple of minutes walk from our little house. The canal was built as part of the city defences and the northern section zig zags – a defensive arrangement. The city walls used to stand on an embankment to the south of this section of the canal but they were dismantled many years ago as the city expanded northwards and a park created where they used to stand. We followed the path along the canal bank through the park.

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We spent the rest of the morning mooching around the pleasant streets in the city centre before grabbing a bite to eat in the cafe on the top floor of the Hudson Bay department store

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from where there are good views over the city.

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The building that the Hudson Bay store occupies was built in the 1930’s for the Vroom en Dreesman store. It’s architecture is modernist in style with Amsterdam School and Art Deco influences. It’s something of a Marmite building – you either love it or hate it – I fall into the former camp! V and D went bust in 2015 and the building was unoccupied the first time we visited Haarlem, but it was taken over by Hudson Bay (a Canadian company) who opened there in 2018.

There are some rather nice stained glass windows in the stairwell and on some of the floors

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After we’d eaten we wandered through the shopping streets down to the Spaarn and made our way to the Tyler’s Museum. Our visit there warrants its own post so to finish this one, here’s a few photos I took around the town (some taken later in the week).

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Spitalfields

I was back in London for a day last week with work. As I had an early start, I went down the evening before and not being one for sitting around in a hotel room, I decided to get out for a wander. I was staying near Tower Bridge, but rather than stick to the more touristy areas nearby (especially busy at this time of the year) I wandered over to Whitechapel and then over to Spitalfields.

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The district was created in the 17th century and became populated with Irish and Huguenot silk weavers. The industry prospered for a while but went into decline, as did the area which became something of a notorious slum. Over time other immigrants moved in, Jewish and then later in the 20th Century there was an influx of Bangladeshi immigrants, who also worked in the local textile industry and made Brick Lane the curry capital of London.

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Today, like much of the East End, the area has been gentrified with the old Victorian market and surrounding streets being redeveloped. It’s quite a “buzzing” area at night, centred on the curry houses on Brick Lane, although they seem to be more up-market these days.

I had a good mooch around and took a few photos before heading back to my hotel.

A favourite building of mine is Hawksmoor’s Christ Church. One of the six, eccentric English Baroque churches for which he is best known. I’ll get a look inside one of these days (it’s never open when I’ve been there!)

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There’s quite a few streets where the 17th century buildings are still standing, with many having been renovated

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Street art too, especially around Brick Lane

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After had a good mooch, it was a short walk back to my hotel which was opposite this well known landmark

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Moel Hebog

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The last day of my break in Snowdonia promised to be fine and sunny. I weighed up my options and decided I’d tackle Moel Hebog, the 2,569 foot high mountain to the south west of Beddgelert and which had dominated the view for a good part of my walk the previous day. It wasn’t an easy option as it was tough going both up and down – but in different ways.

Climbing Moel Hebog can be combined with the adjacent mountains of Moel yr Ogof and Moel Lefn for for a longer walk. But as this was my last day and I had a fairly long drive home, I thought it would be enough to tackle one of them

After I checked out of the hostel, I drove the few miles to Beddgelert and parked up. The small village is on the West Highland tourist railway line and my route took me past the station

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and then under and then over the line, which meanders around. I carried on along a track until I reached a gate and, going through, was at the beginning of the path up the mountain.

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After a short flat section it began to climb up towards the summit. It started steep and got steeper and height was gained rapidly. It was a good sunny morning with little cloud about and although it was a little hazy in the distance, good views of the Snowdon range and nearby mountains soon opened up.

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Looking west towards the Nantile ridge
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Snowdon
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Moel Siabod in the distance

It was a clear path up a grassy slope with a few rocky outcrops at first, but as I got nearer to the summit the route became more difficult. There was rocky ground and scree ahead and it wasn’t so easy to work out the line of the path. Unlike when I climbed Snowdon a couple of days before, there were very few people around. I’d passed a lone walker, a similar age to me, although he wasn’t very chatty. But as I reached the more difficult part of the climb, there was a ground of youngish women ahead of me. They were locals, mainly young mothers taking a day out together before the schools broke up for the summer holidays. They were friendly and as they’d been up the mountain before (this was an annual trip for them) they had a good idea of the line of the route, so I followed them! Avoiding a head on assault of the crags on the north face of the mountain, the route went round to the left and then turned right. But it was far from clear on the ground and it would have been difficult to work out where it was going without tapping in to the local knowledge!

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After a good bit of scrambling and struggling up sections of scree, I hit a grassy ridge which made it a much easier walk up to the summit.

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I stopped for a while to take in the views and grab a bite to eat, as did the group of young women and the other lone walker. What a difference to the top of Snowdon!

On a sunny day the views were outstanding in every direction – better than even from the top of Snowdon. We could see across to Snowdon itself and other mountains, the Llyn peninsula, Anglesey, and right down to the sea.

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Looking towards Snowdon
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I could have stayed longer, but it was time to start heading back down. I’d decided on a circular route, and it certainly wouldn’t have been much fun working my way down through the scree if I returned by the same route I came up. so from the summit I followed the wall leading down to the North West and Moel yr Ogof .

It was a steep slope (it would have been particularly difficult if it had been wet) but I used my walking poles to keep me from stumbling down head over heels. Reaching the bwylch between Moel Hebog and Moel yr Ogof.

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Looking back up to Moel Hebog

I crossed another wall and turned right, taking the path that ran beside the wall and descended down towards Beddgelert forest. I could see the other lone walker making his way up the path to Moel yr Ogof as he intended to tackle all three mountains.

There were superb views of  the Snowdon massif as I descended

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Getting close to the forest, I missed a turn off the path which would lead me into the forest, but I realised I’d gone wrong and after a little while I managed to locate a ladder stile. The path continued on down through the forest. It was boggy and hard going in places, but I persevered. The route eventually turned off onto a forest track

The track continued on out of the forest and onward towards Beddgelert, eventually retracing my steps from the beginning of the walk. There was a train standing at the platform as I passed the station

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It pulled out as I passed

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I dumped my rucksack back in the car boot and wandered into Beddgelert to find myself a brew and a couple of Welsh cakes.

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Refreshed, I had a little wander around the pretty little village and bought a few presents

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and had a last look at the mountain I’d climbed from the path beside the river

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and then it was back to the car for the drive home.