Art in the Queen’s House

The Queen’s House at Greenwich is primarily used as a gallery to display art from the Maritime Museum’s collection. The works are mainly paintings of ships, naval battles, trade, diplomacy, exploration, and scientific discovery and portraits of kings and naval notables. Much of this of only cursory interest to myself. However, there were a number of works that appealed. Here are some of them.

I rather liked this painting by Evelyn de Morgan, a rare female Pre-Raphaelite. I’d seen a small exhibition of her work at Blackwell last year.

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The Sea Maidens by Evelyn de Morgan

I rather liked this Dutch delftware tile panel picture of whaling vesels. The gallery’s information panel tells us that such panels were popular in the Netherlands in the 17th and 18th Centuries and were used to decorate fireplaces, kitchens and dairies.

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Delftware tile panel

Opposite was a modern take on the tile panel picture by Tania Kovats

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Sea Mark (2014) by Tania Kovats

This painting of a stormy sea rather reminded me of some paintings by Maggi Hambling I’d seen at the Lowry in Salford back in 2009. We’re going to Whitby in a few months and I hope the weather is kinder.

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Rain, Rainbow and Stormy Seas, North Cliff, Whitby (1974) by Godfrey Coker

And nearby, another rough sea a little further up North Sea coast.

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View of Whitley Bay, Northumberland (1909) by John Falconer Slater

I recognised the subject of the upper painting in this pair of portraits even before I read the information panel – It’s Emma Hamilton (nee Hart) – and below her is a portrait of her famous lover, Horatio Nelson.

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I’d also guessed correctly that the artist was George Romney, originally from Kendal. We’ve become very familiar with his work during our visits to Abbot Hall in his home town. Emma Hart was his muse – he painted over 60 paintings of her, often portraying historical and mythological characters. Abbot Hall, for example, have a painting of her portraying Miranda from Shakespeare’s Tempest.

I liked this textile hanging by Alexander Hardie Williamson, produced for Yarrow Shipbuilders of Glasgow, inspired by ships built on the Clyde. Alas, not much left of that once great industry in Glasgow, or Britain, for that matter.
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There were also some displays of contemporary art.

There was a display of lithographs by Marian Maguire, an artist from Christchurch in New Zealand, featuring

An imagined meeting between ancient Greeks and the Maori of New Zealand brought about by the arrival of the Endeavour in the late eighteenth century.

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Portrait of Captain James Cook with a Classical Urn from the Collection of the Admiralty (2005) by Marian Maguire

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This series of images from Michelle Stuart’s

arranges astronomy-themed photographs in a grid, lending a narrative character to her poetic pieces.

It combines sights of star clusters, galaxies and nebulae with fireworks, on which Stuart has placed images of telescopic or photographic antique lenses. The lenses invite us to consider the importance of telescopes and cameras in the development of astronomical knowledge.

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Drawing on Space (2011) by Michelle Stuart

and in the same room some old educational posters showing celestial bodies

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In one of the rooms on the ground floor there was a photographic exhibition Shorelines which

presents life on the British coast and the evolving practice of photography for over 100 years, showing the documentary capacity of the camera and the artistic appeal of photographs

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An interesting example of a glass-silver negative on glass

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The Sennen Rocket Brigade Rescuing Crew from the Steamship City of Cardiff, Lands End (1912)

A modern documentary series of 32 portraits of men and women working in the Moray Firth fishing community on the North East coast of Scotland, shot on location in harbours, shipyards, factories and sheds between 2009 and 2012.by Paul Duke

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At Sea: A Portrait of a Scottish Fishing Community (2012) by Paul Duke

and imaginative contemporary works pushing the boundaries of photography.

This work by Tessa Traeger is from a series created from glass plate negatives she inherited from her grandmother’s cousin, a keen amateur photographer and co-owner of a chemist shop in Tunbridge Wells

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Chemistry of Light No 41 Bank Holiday Crowd (2014) by Tessa Traeger

Traeger was particularly drawn to those where the silver gelatin emulsion was decaying, and, photographing these with mirrors or back-lighting, created works that are at once ghostly and charming. With her series, Traeger captures the atmosphere of the time in which the photographs were initially taken, whilst evoking a sense of things past, and lost. (Museum website)

Susan Derges’ ‘Starfield Shoreline’

combines camera-based and camera-less techniques: a view of the heavens, taken in a backyard observatory in South Taunton with a 5/4 Linhof field camera; and a wave sweeping the shoreline, captured on light-sensitive paper laid on the waters edge, exposed to moonlight and a microsecond of flashlight as a wave passes across it. By overlaying the seashore with the image of a star field, Susan Derges connects the ocean and the cosmos, life on Earth to the wider universe. (Museum website)

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Starfield Shoreline (2009) by Susan Derges

There’s much more to see. I expected to spend no more than an hour in the Queen’s house, but by the time I’d finished looking around found that about two hours had passed.

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