Clocking in

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A little before we clocked in and joined the production line in Tate Exchange we’d seen a series of 8,627 photographs and a film showing someone clocking in on the hour, every hour,  24 hours a day for a full 12 months during 1980-1981. One Year Perormance was undertaken by Taiwanese artist Tehching Hsieh in his studio in New York.

Marking the occasion by taking a self-portrait on a single frame of 16mm film, the resulting reel documents a year in his life at approximately one second per day – a pace that is polar opposite of the enduring length of the original performance

At the beginning of the project he shaved off his hair and we can see it gradually grow back in the series of photographs and the film.

It seemed such an odd thing to do. It meant that he was unable to sleep properly for a full year. He missed 133 clock-ins, and the reasons are documented on a note which is displayed amongst the contextual materials included in the exhibition along with letters, statements, uniforms, photographs, the punch clock itself and a time card. The main reason given was, not surprisingly,  sleeping through.

According to an interview in the Guardian the artist, the work

recalls the labours of Sisyphus, who, in Greek mythology, was forced to roll a rock repeatedly up a mountain, only to watch it fall down again

while it may seem to convey a message about the tedium and conformity of industrial labour, he tells Guardian Australia he is “not a political artist, although people are at liberty to interpret my work from a political standpoint … I’m interested in the universal circumstances of human life”.

Although clearly a crazy thing to do, there was something rather fascinating about the project and, personally, I can certainly see a political message about the alienation of work and how people are enslaved by work that is certainly relevant in this day of zero hour contracts and so-called self employed status workers employed by the likes of Uber and courier services.

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Back to Borough Market

A few days after our short break in the Peak District I was down in Dartford with work. I’d travelled down by train via London so we decided to combine work with pleasure and the other half travelled down on the Friday morning and met me in London for a short stay. We were staying in a Premier Inn at Southwark near Borough Market. It’s a really “buzzing” area during the evening with plenty of places to eat and lots of pubs and bars, all of which were busy on an autumn evening. The terrorist attack by zealots who don’t like people having fun only a few weeks ago doesn’t seem to have stopped people getting out and enjoying themselves – and that’s the way it should be.

We had a rather nice contemporary style Leabanese meal at a busy Arabica , a restaurant under the railway arches on Rochester Walk near the market

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followed by a stroll along the South Bank before turning in

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The next day, after breakfast we went for a wander around the market.

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Giacometti at Tate Modern

I’d been looking forward to seeing the retrospective of work by Giacometti, a favourite artist of mine, that opened recently at Tate Modern. So when I was down in London a couple of weeks ago, I made time to visit the gallery on London’s Bankside.

Giacometti is a favourite artist – I like his trademark sculptures of elongated figures – walking men and standing women – with their rough, textured surfaces. The exhibition included plenty of those, with works from the Tate’s own collection, like Man Pointing  (1947)

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with other examples from public and private collections. As usual with these paid exhibitions, no photos allowed so the pictures in this post are either photos I’ve taken during previous visits to Tate Modern, or from the exhibition website.

As a retrospective, it included earlier works before the Swiss artist developed his signature style. In particular, his surrealist works from the 1930’s

The first room contained a large table covered with a large number of sculptures of heads in different styles and made from various materials – some quite tiny – covering his career, Being displayed in this way really allowed visitors to see how his style developed – initially relatively ‘lifelike’

Head of Isabel 1936

Head of Isabel 1936

they evolved into more abstract, fatter forms, eventually becoming flat and featureless rectangles from his Surrealist period. Then the later sculptures in the style for which he is best known. The heads included sculptures of his family members, friends and some famous individuals, including Simone de Beauvoir.

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Bust of Annette IV (1962)

Moving on through the other 9 rooms was a progression through his career. The next few rooms displaying abstract and Surrealist works – sculptures, decorative pieces (lamps, vases, jewellery and wall reliefs) and sketches in his notebooks.

Probably the most Surrealist of the works in the exhibition was the rather grusome Woman With Her Throat Cut (1932)more of a weird insect than a human being

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After WWII, he returned to Paris where he began to produce the elongated figures for which he is best known. These dominated the final 5 rooms

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Three men walking (source: Wikipedia)

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The dog (1951)

This is what I’d come to see. They’re simple, almost like 3 dimensional versions of L S Lowry’s ‘matchstick men’ in their complex simplicity

The thin figures that emerged like wisps of smoke out of Giacometti’s conscience in the second part of that murderous decade seem barely to exist. They are not so much statues as mirages of people glimpsed far away, shimmering on a horizon of ash. The human form, starved, bereft, but somehow standing tall. (Guardian)

There were paintings too. Again, he has a distinctive style. The figures are made up of a series of lines which merge to form an image rather like the dots in a Pointillist painting

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Seated Man (1949)

Caroline 1965

Caroline (1965)

This was a marvellous exhibition that didn’t disappoint.

Meridian House, Greenwich

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I spotted the tower of this rather splendid red brick Art Deco style building while I was in Greenwich last week so wandered over to have a closer look.

The tower belongs to Meridian House, the former Greenwich Town Hall which was built in 1938-9 to a design by Clifford Culpin. Its original use was as a municipal facility including offices, and included a civic suite and public hall but was sold off by the London Borough of Greenwich in the 1970s and now houses the Greenwich School of Management and private flats.  The Borough Hall is occupied by “Greenwich Dance” .

The elegant clock tower is the building’s  most prominent feature and was apparently influenced by the work of the Dutch architect W. M. Dudok, paricularly the Hilversum Town Hall. It was designed not only to function as both a clock tower but a public observation tower so local residents could view the Royal Naval College and the Thames.

According to Pevsner the building was

“the only town hall of any London borough to represent the style of our time adequately”.  (Buildings of; England, London 2: South)

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Nelson’s Ship in a bottle

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This giant ship in a bottle can be seen near the rear entrance to the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich. It’s by the Anglo-Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare MBE.

The ship is a model of Nelson’s flagship, Victory, but with the sails made of the Dutch Wax printed fabrics (African style fabrics) he uses extensively in his work.

Nelson’s Ship in a Bottle’ was the 2010 Fourth Plinth Commission, and was displayed in Trafalgar Square, London, until January 2012.

Art in the Queen’s House

The Queen’s House at Greenwich is primarily used as a gallery to display art from the Maritime Museum’s collection. The works are mainly paintings of ships, naval battles, trade, diplomacy, exploration, and scientific discovery and portraits of kings and naval notables. Much of this of only cursory interest to myself. However, there were a number of works that appealed. Here are some of them.

I rather liked this painting by Evelyn de Morgan, a rare female Pre-Raphaelite. I’d seen a small exhibition of her work at Blackwell last year.

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The Sea Maidens by Evelyn de Morgan

I rather liked this Dutch delftware tile panel picture of whaling vesels. The gallery’s information panel tells us that such panels were popular in the Netherlands in the 17th and 18th Centuries and were used to decorate fireplaces, kitchens and dairies.

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Delftware tile panel

Opposite was a modern take on the tile panel picture by Tania Kovats

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Sea Mark (2014) by Tania Kovats

This painting of a stormy sea rather reminded me of some paintings by Maggi Hambling I’d seen at the Lowry in Salford back in 2009. We’re going to Whitby in a few months and I hope the weather is kinder.

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Rain, Rainbow and Stormy Seas, North Cliff, Whitby (1974) by Godfrey Coker

And nearby, another rough sea a little further up North Sea coast.

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View of Whitley Bay, Northumberland (1909) by John Falconer Slater

I recognised the subject of the upper painting in this pair of portraits even before I read the information panel – It’s Emma Hamilton (nee Hart) – and below her is a portrait of her famous lover, Horatio Nelson.

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I’d also guessed correctly that the artist was George Romney, originally from Kendal. We’ve become very familiar with his work during our visits to Abbot Hall in his home town. Emma Hart was his muse – he painted over 60 paintings of her, often portraying historical and mythological characters. Abbot Hall, for example, have a painting of her portraying Miranda from Shakespeare’s Tempest.

I liked this textile hanging by Alexander Hardie Williamson, produced for Yarrow Shipbuilders of Glasgow, inspired by ships built on the Clyde. Alas, not much left of that once great industry in Glasgow, or Britain, for that matter.
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There were also some displays of contemporary art.

There was a display of lithographs by Marian Maguire, an artist from Christchurch in New Zealand, featuring

An imagined meeting between ancient Greeks and the Maori of New Zealand brought about by the arrival of the Endeavour in the late eighteenth century.

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Portrait of Captain James Cook with a Classical Urn from the Collection of the Admiralty (2005) by Marian Maguire

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This series of images from Michelle Stuart’s

arranges astronomy-themed photographs in a grid, lending a narrative character to her poetic pieces.

It combines sights of star clusters, galaxies and nebulae with fireworks, on which Stuart has placed images of telescopic or photographic antique lenses. The lenses invite us to consider the importance of telescopes and cameras in the development of astronomical knowledge.

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Drawing on Space (2011) by Michelle Stuart

and in the same room some old educational posters showing celestial bodies

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In one of the rooms on the ground floor there was a photographic exhibition Shorelines which

presents life on the British coast and the evolving practice of photography for over 100 years, showing the documentary capacity of the camera and the artistic appeal of photographs

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An interesting example of a glass-silver negative on glass

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The Sennen Rocket Brigade Rescuing Crew from the Steamship City of Cardiff, Lands End (1912)

A modern documentary series of 32 portraits of men and women working in the Moray Firth fishing community on the North East coast of Scotland, shot on location in harbours, shipyards, factories and sheds between 2009 and 2012.by Paul Duke

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At Sea: A Portrait of a Scottish Fishing Community (2012) by Paul Duke

and imaginative contemporary works pushing the boundaries of photography.

This work by Tessa Traeger is from a series created from glass plate negatives she inherited from her grandmother’s cousin, a keen amateur photographer and co-owner of a chemist shop in Tunbridge Wells

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Chemistry of Light No 41 Bank Holiday Crowd (2014) by Tessa Traeger

Traeger was particularly drawn to those where the silver gelatin emulsion was decaying, and, photographing these with mirrors or back-lighting, created works that are at once ghostly and charming. With her series, Traeger captures the atmosphere of the time in which the photographs were initially taken, whilst evoking a sense of things past, and lost. (Museum website)

Susan Derges’ ‘Starfield Shoreline’

combines camera-based and camera-less techniques: a view of the heavens, taken in a backyard observatory in South Taunton with a 5/4 Linhof field camera; and a wave sweeping the shoreline, captured on light-sensitive paper laid on the waters edge, exposed to moonlight and a microsecond of flashlight as a wave passes across it. By overlaying the seashore with the image of a star field, Susan Derges connects the ocean and the cosmos, life on Earth to the wider universe. (Museum website)

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Starfield Shoreline (2009) by Susan Derges

There’s much more to see. I expected to spend no more than an hour in the Queen’s house, but by the time I’d finished looking around found that about two hours had passed.