Wembley

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These days, the Saturday of the August Bank Holiday is the Rugby League Challenge Cup Final Day. This year Wigan, despite a rather mediocre season,  managed to book a place in the final to face Hull FC. So early morning, tickets in hand, we boarded the coach that would take us to Wembley. A long journey. The journey home seemed even longer as, consistent with their form Wigan didn’t play brilliantly and with Hull having done their homework, playing to Wigan’s weaknesses,  Hull took the cup home with them. It was close. Both teams scored the same number of tries but Wigan missed two conversions. And, controversially,  they had a try chalked off by the video ref.  Wigan didn’t disgrace themselves and kept on battling to the end, having a try disallowed for a forward pass in the dying seconds. But it was a fair result as overall Hull were the better team on the day.

Ah well, you can’t always win! 😦

It’s taken me a couple of weeks to recover from the disappointment, but, other than the result, it was an enjoyable day. Here’s a few photos I snapped.

 

 

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Kendal Castle

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After our visit to Abbot Hall to see the Julian Cooper exhibition we had a wander round the town centre and then, as it had turned into a pleasant afternoon, we decided to walk up to Kendal Castle. The Castle was built in the early 12th Century on a glacial hill left behind from the last ice age, to the east of the town. It was more of a fortified manor house  for the local barons, than a military stronghold, but it would have dominated the town, looking over it from it’s prominent high position. And it would have been a potent symbol of their wealth and power.

Crossing the River Kent near to Abbot Hall, it’s a short walk to Castle Hill.

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It’s then a short, if steep, climb up to the castle.

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I didn’t have my camera with me, but the good light meant I was able to get some decent shots using my phone.

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Visibility was good so there were great views over to Red Screes and the Kentmere fells.

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We could clearly see Yoke and Ill Bell that we’d climber only a few weeks before.

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We had a quick look round the interior of the ruined castle

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Family Day in Liverpool

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It’s become a tradition that a few days before Christmas we have a “family day” where we do something, and/or go somewhere to spend some time together. This year we decided to go to Liverpool the day before Christmas Eve. We were lucky. It was a beautiful winter’s day. Blue sky and sunshine. A relief from the seemingly endless days of rain we’d had for several weeks – and, as it turned out, from the days that followed.

First stop was St John’s tower. It was a great day for looking over the rooftops and taking in a panorama of the city and the outskirts.

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On a good clear day we could see out to sea and as far as the Welsh mountains. And the ferry crossing the Mersey

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Afterwards up Mount Pleasant, stopping off for a coffee on route, towards the Philharmonic Hall for a lunchtime concert. Merry Brassmas featured five members of the Liverpool Philharmonic brass section playing arrangements of Christmas songs for a brass quintet interspersed with some readings and with audience participation, singing carols.

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An enjoyable hour’s entertainment, and I was now beginning to feel “Christmassy”.

Then we walked down towards Albert Dock

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to the Maritime Museum.

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After that a walk along the old docks towards the Pier Head

 

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for a quick visit to the Museum of Liverpool Life

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The views from both ends of the building

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As we left the museum, night was beginning to descend.

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After a wander around the Liverpool One and Church Street (window shopping only) we went for a meal at Jamie’s

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Then it was time to make our way back towards the Anglican cathedral where we’d parked the car, passing the Chinese Arch

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Merry Christmas Manchester

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I took the day off on Monday. We had tickets for the Kate Rusby Christmas concert at the Bridgewater Hall so, having had a hectic couple of weeks at work, I took the opportunity to spend some time mooching round Manchester.

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We spent some time looking round the Christmas market which, there days, has taken over the city centre. We didn’t buy much, but it was fun looking around, especially when it went dark and the lights came on. At this time of the year, especially on a gloomy day like Monday, that was quite early!

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Dunham Massey – a walk in the park and gardens

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It had been nice all week while I’d been working away. Sunday afternoon looked promising so we decided to make the most of a fine autumn afternoon before the weather turned, so dove over to Dunham Massey to take a walk round the park and gardens.

Despite being late in the year, the gardens were still very colourful, with autumn hues breaking out and some plants still in bloom.

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We had an enjoyable walk around the grounds.

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There were plenty of deer to be seen.

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and some recent wood carvings

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Make Yourself Comfortable at Chatsworth

During our recent visit to Chatsworth we bought a combined House and Garden ticket for although our main motivation for visiting was to see the Beyond Limits exhibition in he gardens, we also wanted to have another look around the house to revisit the collection of Modern Art on display. We’d also read that there was an exhibition of contemporary seating taking place. Initially I wasn’t sure it would be of much interest, but, as it happened, I was wrong!

The Chatsworth website told us that:

Make Yourself Comfortable at Chatsworth will see items from the private collection of the Duke and Duchess showcased alongside furniture by internationally acclaimed and innovative designers – from Thomas Heatherwick and Amanda Levete, to Marc Newson, Tokujin Yoshioka, Piet Hein Eek and Moritz Waldemeyer. The exhibition will also showcase thought-provoking, specially commissioned pieces, including Raw Edges’ End Grain seating which will become part of the Sculpture Gallery, and Synthesis IV by emerging designer Tom Price which will be on display in the Chapel.

Chairs and other types of seating were positioned around the house and visitors were allowed to take advantage of them, try them out and rest their legs for a while.

Some of the chairs were very comfortable

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Others less so!

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These were the first we saw. Designed to spin around so you could view the painted ceiling in the entrance hall (if you didn’t lose you balance and fall off!)

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These were chairs designed for readers (I think Milady would like these)

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A bench made of coal

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and one of resin infused with bitumen

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both reflecting the Dukes of Devonshire’s association with the mineral extraction industries.

Some others we saw

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Towards the end of the tour of the house, in the dining room, around the large dining table there were chairs designed by students from Sheffield

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Finally, in the sculpture hall a very interesting collection specially created for the exhibition

(an) indoor landscape created by Raw Edges in the Sculpture Gallery, where benches and stools emerge like tree trunks from the coloured grid-like floor and offer new perspectives of the sculptures.

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