Nelson’s Ship in a bottle

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This giant ship in a bottle can be seen near the rear entrance to the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich. It’s by the Anglo-Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare MBE.

The ship is a model of Nelson’s flagship, Victory, but with the sails made of the Dutch Wax printed fabrics (African style fabrics) he uses extensively in his work.

Nelson’s Ship in a Bottle’ was the 2010 Fourth Plinth Commission, and was displayed in Trafalgar Square, London, until January 2012.

Art in the Queen’s House

The Queen’s House at Greenwich is primarily used as a gallery to display art from the Maritime Museum’s collection. The works are mainly paintings of ships, naval battles, trade, diplomacy, exploration, and scientific discovery and portraits of kings and naval notables. Much of this of only cursory interest to myself. However, there were a number of works that appealed. Here are some of them.

I rather liked this painting by Evelyn de Morgan, a rare female Pre-Raphaelite. I’d seen a small exhibition of her work at Blackwell last year.

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The Sea Maidens by Evelyn de Morgan

I rather liked this Dutch delftware tile panel picture of whaling vesels. The gallery’s information panel tells us that such panels were popular in the Netherlands in the 17th and 18th Centuries and were used to decorate fireplaces, kitchens and dairies.

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Delftware tile panel

Opposite was a modern take on the tile panel picture by Tania Kovats

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Sea Mark (2014) by Tania Kovats

This painting of a stormy sea rather reminded me of some paintings by Maggi Hambling I’d seen at the Lowry in Salford back in 2009. We’re going to Whitby in a few months and I hope the weather is kinder.

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Rain, Rainbow and Stormy Seas, North Cliff, Whitby (1974) by Godfrey Coker

And nearby, another rough sea a little further up North Sea coast.

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View of Whitley Bay, Northumberland (1909) by John Falconer Slater

I recognised the subject of the upper painting in this pair of portraits even before I read the information panel – It’s Emma Hamilton (nee Hart) – and below her is a portrait of her famous lover, Horatio Nelson.

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I’d also guessed correctly that the artist was George Romney, originally from Kendal. We’ve become very familiar with his work during our visits to Abbot Hall in his home town. Emma Hart was his muse – he painted over 60 paintings of her, often portraying historical and mythological characters. Abbot Hall, for example, have a painting of her portraying Miranda from Shakespeare’s Tempest.

I liked this textile hanging by Alexander Hardie Williamson, produced for Yarrow Shipbuilders of Glasgow, inspired by ships built on the Clyde. Alas, not much left of that once great industry in Glasgow, or Britain, for that matter.
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There were also some displays of contemporary art.

There was a display of lithographs by Marian Maguire, an artist from Christchurch in New Zealand, featuring

An imagined meeting between ancient Greeks and the Maori of New Zealand brought about by the arrival of the Endeavour in the late eighteenth century.

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Portrait of Captain James Cook with a Classical Urn from the Collection of the Admiralty (2005) by Marian Maguire

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This series of images from Michelle Stuart’s

arranges astronomy-themed photographs in a grid, lending a narrative character to her poetic pieces.

It combines sights of star clusters, galaxies and nebulae with fireworks, on which Stuart has placed images of telescopic or photographic antique lenses. The lenses invite us to consider the importance of telescopes and cameras in the development of astronomical knowledge.

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Drawing on Space (2011) by Michelle Stuart

and in the same room some old educational posters showing celestial bodies

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In one of the rooms on the ground floor there was a photographic exhibition Shorelines which

presents life on the British coast and the evolving practice of photography for over 100 years, showing the documentary capacity of the camera and the artistic appeal of photographs

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An interesting example of a glass-silver negative on glass

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The Sennen Rocket Brigade Rescuing Crew from the Steamship City of Cardiff, Lands End (1912)

A modern documentary series of 32 portraits of men and women working in the Moray Firth fishing community on the North East coast of Scotland, shot on location in harbours, shipyards, factories and sheds between 2009 and 2012.by Paul Duke

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At Sea: A Portrait of a Scottish Fishing Community (2012) by Paul Duke

and imaginative contemporary works pushing the boundaries of photography.

This work by Tessa Traeger is from a series created from glass plate negatives she inherited from her grandmother’s cousin, a keen amateur photographer and co-owner of a chemist shop in Tunbridge Wells

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Chemistry of Light No 41 Bank Holiday Crowd (2014) by Tessa Traeger

Traeger was particularly drawn to those where the silver gelatin emulsion was decaying, and, photographing these with mirrors or back-lighting, created works that are at once ghostly and charming. With her series, Traeger captures the atmosphere of the time in which the photographs were initially taken, whilst evoking a sense of things past, and lost. (Museum website)

Susan Derges’ ‘Starfield Shoreline’

combines camera-based and camera-less techniques: a view of the heavens, taken in a backyard observatory in South Taunton with a 5/4 Linhof field camera; and a wave sweeping the shoreline, captured on light-sensitive paper laid on the waters edge, exposed to moonlight and a microsecond of flashlight as a wave passes across it. By overlaying the seashore with the image of a star field, Susan Derges connects the ocean and the cosmos, life on Earth to the wider universe. (Museum website)

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Starfield Shoreline (2009) by Susan Derges

There’s much more to see. I expected to spend no more than an hour in the Queen’s house, but by the time I’d finished looking around found that about two hours had passed.

The Raisbeck Pinfold

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Before we went up to Orton for our walk around the limestone pavements I’d spotted that there was one of Andy Goldsworthy’s sheepfolds not so far away near the small hamlet of Raisbeck.

SHEEPFOLDS is Cumbria County Council’s major county-wide sculpture, landscape and environment project by the internationally renowned artist ANDY GOLDSWORTHY. The project started in January 1996 for the ‘U.K. Year of Visual Arts’ in what was then the Northern Arts Board region. Beginning as part of this programme Andy Goldsworthy has created a body of environmentally responsive sculptural works across Cumbria using existing sheepfolds, washfolds and pinfolds.

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Although each fold is an individual piece, the project should be seen as a single work of art .

The one at Raisbeck is one of the artist’s cone pinfold’s. Pinfold appears to be a northern term for a pound, where stray animals were kept until claimed by their owners who would have to pay a release fee. If unclaimed, the animals would be sold.

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In each of his cone pinfolds, Goldsworthy has built a conical stone structure – hence their name. On the project website he explains how the shape of these structures was inspired by the Nine Standards, stone cairns on Hartley Fell near Kirkby Stephen, and describes how they were constructed. He tells us that

The form is full and ripe – an optimistic expression of the power of growth and that even out of stone comes life. They are strong yet the form appears precarious – not unlike the nature of growth itself.’

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Their are nine cone pinfold cones around Kirkby Stephen, reflecting the Nine Standards

The Raisbeck cone features in a book about the sheepfold project. In it we learn that it was an existing, ruined structure that Goldsworthy rebuilt over a period of two weeks in May 1996 using stone from a redundant wall from a nearby farm. The cone took three days to construct, using limestone and sandstone from local sources.

In the 20 years since it was built a number of trees have started to grow around the structure. So, although it is located very close to the narrow road, we managed to drive right past. But we realised pretty quickly so stopped, parked up on the verge and walked back to take a look

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A short distance down the road, next to a disused quarry, there’s another interesting stone structure – an old lime kiln – a fairly intact relic of a bygone age.

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This leaflet about the limestone landscape on the Orton fells tells us that

There are 23 small quarries and 20 lime kilns recorded in the local area. Most of these were used over the course of the last 500 years for processing lime for agricultural and domestic use.

The limestone, calcium carbonate, was “burnt” in the kilns to form “quick lime” (calcium oxide) which was then used in mortar, to render stonework and decorate walls (“whitewash”), to improve the fertility of acidic soils and to improve land drainage.

Looking at the project website, there’s a number of other Goldsworthy sheepfolds in the area around Tebay and Kirkby Stephen. Another reason to revisit the area.

Julian Cooper at Abbot Hall

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On Easter Saturday we drove up to Abbot Hall to take a look at their latest exhibition – a mini-retrospective of the work of a Cumbrian artist, Julian Cooper.

The paintings on display could be divided into four periods

His earliest works, shown on the landing at the top of the main staircase are quite abstract, although clearly based on vegetation and geological formations. The paintings from the second period, displayed in the first room, were figurative. A number of them based on Malcolm Lowry’s novel Under the Volcano and feature characters from the novel. But dominating the background are mountains, which later became the primary focus of his work.

The work then evolves again into a unique form of representation that is frequently near-abstract in its emphasis on the texture, shadow and irregular surfaces of rock and ice.  these mature period works

These mature period works were my favourites.

The second room was dominated by two large paintings of the Tibetan holy mountain, Mount Kailash which he visited in early spring 2006. One painting shows it’s north face, the other, the south.

A unique mountain, Kailash is worshipped by Hindus, Jain and Buddhists alike as the home of their Gods yet is so remote and difficult to get to that it is visited by only a handful of pilgrims each year. (Art Space Gallery Press Release)

The majority of the other paintings in this and the third rooms are close ups of rock faces, many of them from quarries in Italy, Tasmania and his native Cumbria.

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They are very detailed and standing back they are very realistic – particularly the Cumbrian works. However, they also have an abstract quality particularly when viewed a little closer.

A number of his paint brushes and palettes give an insight into his method of work. He works on large canvases yet despite this many of his paintings are started “plein air” and supplemented by photographs and then finished back in his studio Working in a large scale he uses large paint brushes with long handles, sometimes extending them to make them even longer.

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It must be something of a challenge to get his large canvases up into the relatively inaccessible locations in the mountains.  I found this interesting article by the artist, describing how he went about painting the holy Mount Kailish in Tibet.

Kaleidoscope: Colour and Sequence in 1960s British Art

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After looking round the exhibition in the old Chapel, we walked across the Country Park, down rast the lower lake and up the hill to the Longside Gallery where there was yet another new exhibition to see! Kaleidoscope: Colour and Sequence in 1960s British Art is a survey of

painting and sculpture from the Arts Council Collection, and augmented with major loans from important UK collections…. (which) …… examines the art of the 1960s through a fresh and surprising lens, one bringing into direct view the relationship between colour and form, rationality and irrationality, order and waywardness.

There’s a good selection of works by 20 British artists including  Anthony Caro, Bridget Riley and William Turnbull. I was familiar with some of them but there were some discoveries (always good!).

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The works on display included examples of Op Art, Pop Art and Constructivism, and

the sequential placement of brightly-coloured abstract units found in New Generation sculpture.

The Longside gallery is another good, airy exhibition space with large windows facing north letting in plenty of light.

Here are a selection of the works I liked

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Blue Ring (1966) by David Annesley

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Slow Movement (1965) by Anthony Caro

 

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Thebes (1966) by William Tucker

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Double Red (1966) by William Turnbull

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Quinquereme (1966) by Tim Scott

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Movement in Squares (1961) by Bridget Riley

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Ilmater (1966-7) by Jeffery Steele

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Holywood Pix (1967) by Anthony Donaldson

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Pelagic II (1967) by Bernard Farmer

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15.5.64 (1964) by John Hoyland

One of my favourites was Suspense (1966) by Peter Sedgely. This was one of a small number of works from the exhibition where photography wasn’t allowed. Another example of Op Art (like the paintings by Bridget Riley and Jeffery Steele, it was painted in such a way that it seemed that the image was out of focus – very clever!

Another good exhibition – worth the walk up the hill!!

[Re]construct at the YSP

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There’s always plenty to see at the YSP so after our first look around the Tony Cragg exhibition we had something to eat and then walked over to the former chapel which has been converted into an excellent exhibition space to see the [Re]construction exhibition which had only opened a few days before.

Selected largely from the Arts Council Collection by YSP, as part of the National Partners Programme, the exhibition questions what we know and understand about architecture, and features work by artists including Martin Creed, Anya Gallaccio and Cornelia Parker.

Walking through the entrance the first thing we saw was what appeared to be a brick wall with a large section of bricks that had melted.

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This was Alex Chinneck’s A hole in a bag of nerves (2017) which was constructed especially for the exhibition. The bricks are made of wax and a section has been melted with a hot air heater.

The centre of the main space was dominated by Cornelia Parker’s Neither From Nor Towards.

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This work comprises weathered bricks from a row of houses destroyed when they slipped into the sea on the south-east coast following the erosion of the cliffs. The bricks are suspended in space, recreating their fall. Like the exploding house we saw at the Whtworth a couple of years ago it was an impressive work.

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This work, can love remember the question and the answer, is by Anya Gallaccio

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Those are real flowers trapped between the glass panes in the mahogany door. The flowers will rot and decay, so the work will change subtly over the course of the exhibition.

There were a number of video works included in the exhibition. I found two of them, Rooms designed for a woman by Emily Speed and Device by John Wood and Paul Harrison – the “ art-world equivalent of Laurel and Hardy” according to the Tate website  showing in the Chapel’s gallery, particularly interesting.