Back on the Moors

Despite moving to part-time work at the end of February I’ve been so busy that I’ve fallen well behind with writing up what I’ve been up to. There’s definitely more to life than working and I’m trying to make the most of my increased “free time” to get out and do more stuff that I enjoy. The problem then is finding the time to write it up! I’ll have to find a solution as writing up these posts allow me to look back and remember what I’ve been up to!

So, back in May a couple of weeks after my “Hebridean adventure” I managed to get up on the West Pennine Moors for a wander. I parked up at Rivington and then made my way over past Moses Cocker’s farm

Moses Cocker’s

and then took a path on to the moor. It was a grey morning but it was still good to get back onto familiar territory to stretch my legs and breathe in the, hopefully, fresh air.

The usual locals were out and about keeping an eye on me

Views soon opened up

as I made my way to the ruined farm known as “Old Rachel’s”

I stopped for a rest to refuel as my blood sugar had dropped, and took in the views. An elderly runner ambled past. I was intrigued as he was wearing wellies rather than the flimsy shoes normally worn by runners on the moors and fells. Two female runners, wearing more conventional footwear, came speeding along a little later. I have to admire their energy and dedication but I prefer a much gentler pace where I can enjoy the scenery and spend time thinking great thoughts!

I carried on following the path to Lower Hempshaw’s

Given the recent rain, I decided I’d not carry on towards Hordern Stoops, the path is notoriously muddy at the best of times, but to follow the track northwards. Just the day before I’d read a post by Michael of the Rivendale Review who had been up on the moors and had ventured up on to Redmond and Spitler’s Edges by taking a path that branched off the track a little further along from Henshaw’s, just where it veers off left towards the ruined farm at Simm’s. I’d taken this track some years ago and found that after a while it petered out and I’d had to make my way through the heather and bracken. It was very different this time. Many other feet must have passed this way since then as there was now a clear path that carried on up to Redmond’s Edge. It was muddy in places so a little “bog hopping” was required.

Although only a few miles from “civilisation” up here it’s real desolate, lonely “wild and windy” moorland.

And being moorland, after a rainy period the peat was sodden. As I made my way towards Great Hill I was thankful for the flagstones that had been laid down otherwise I would have been walking through a quagmire. It was certainly wet as the flagstones were flooded in places and I had to navigate some muddy patches where the flags had sunk into the peat. But the going was generally good.

I climbed to the top of Great Hill and stopped for a while for another bite to eat. It was windy so I was thankful of the stone shelter.

Long rang visibility was poor, so no views over to the mountains of the Lakes, Snowdonia and Yorkshire Dales, but I could make out Pendle Hill to the north east.

After a brief rest I set off down the path off the summit towards White Coppice. Before reaching Drinkwater’s I turned off down the path towards the ruins of Great Hill farm

and then doubled back heading east before re-joining the path along the ridge and heading towards Horden’s Stoops

Coming down off the Edge I could hear distinctive peewit call of a lapwing. I stopped and watch two of the birds performing their acrobatics before flying off across the moor. A sound and a sight that lifts the heart!

Passing the source of the River Yarrow I headed west for a short distance along the Rivington to Belmont Road before joining the old Belmont Road, these days a rough track, which I followed back towards Rivington.

The view over to Great Hill, Redmond’s Edge and Spitler’s Edge form the Old Belmont Road

Reaching the Pigeon Tower

I made my way down through the Terraced Gardens back to my car.

The Seven Arch Bridge in Rivington terraced Gardens

Here’s the route (also available here)

9 thoughts on “Back on the Moors

  1. Tell me about it! How come I had more time for posting when I was working?? 🤷‍♀️
    Love the stone shelter, pigeon tower with chimney and seven arch bridge. Good for you! Barbara

    • Just before I retired from my main job our company accountant said that many people she knew who retired wonder how they ever found time for work!! I think that is certainly true for some people including you, me and Barbara!!
      I’ve upped my part time job to 2 days as 1 day wasn’t enough, but it’s flexible so I can largely work it round other things I want to do.

  2. Even though the weather didn’t seem great, it look liked you had a good day and another good walk.
    I also struggle writing blog post. After spending 40h a week working in front of a screen the weekend I just want to disconnect and enjoy outdoor activities.

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