Settle and Stainforth circular

The Monday of our holiday in Settle, the weather had changes somewhat, the skies having clouded over. However, rain wasn’t forecast so we set out on a walk. We thought we’d head along to Langcliffe on the old road from Settle and then, if the weather held, carry on to Stainforth- and that’s how it worked out.

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Walking on the old road from Settle to Langcliffe. No traffic at all! The road has drystone walls on both sides
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Looking over the fields towards Giggleswick and Giggleswick Scar from the old road
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Reaching Langcliffe we had a look around the old village with it’s large village green
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There’s been a settlement here from before the Norman invasion, but the village’s heyday would have been in the 18th century with the growth of the textile industry. Spinning was the first process to be mechanised with weaving done at home by hand loom weavers. This was eventually mechanised too and several mills were built in the vicinity. Most of the attractive looking stone cottages would have been the home of textile workers – they’re desirable homes and holiday lets these days
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The war memorial – there are 11 names listed from the First World War, and 4 from the Second World War.
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We set off down the old lane towards Stainforth
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The fields divided by dry stone walls, many of which were built following the enclosure of common land – effectively privatisation of the land – during the 17th and 18th centuries
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Ahead we could see Stainforth Scar.
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However, we back tracked a little and took the easier, flatter (albeit a little muddy) lower level route across the fields
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The route took us past the former lime works with the remains of the massive Hoffman continuous kiln, built for the Craven Lime Company in 1873.
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The remains of the Hoffman kiln
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Carrying on through the fields under Stainforth Scar

We reached the small village of Stainforth. I’d hoped we might to stop for a bite to eat in the local pub. I was disappointed though – it’s shut on Mondays!! So we carried on, crossing the main road and making our way down the quiet, narrow lane towards Stainforth bridge

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The old packhorse bridge over the River Ribble, built in the 17th Century, links the villages of Stainforth and Little Stainforth (also known as Knight Stainforth) and is today under the stewardship of the National Trust
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We crossed the bridge and joined the riverside path, making our way very carefully along the very muddy and slippy path towards Stainsforth force
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After stopping for a while to admire the view, we carried on along the riverside path back towards Langcliffe
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where we crossed over the bridge overlooking the weir.

We made our back along the old road to Settle where we stopped for a brew in a peasant cafe on the market square.

17 thoughts on “Settle and Stainforth circular

  1. That’s an attractive circuit. I thought I knew the Lancliffe area quite well, but was unaware of the Hoffmann Kiln. What an interesting piece of industrial heritage. I shall make sure I visit it next time I’m up that way.

  2. Great walking around there. We did a slightly higher route from Stainforth and across the fields to Langcliffe via Catrigg Force and back along the river. Stainforth Force was full of people jumping in the falls, looked a bit risky to me!

  3. Ah I think the walk I did which I mentioned on your next post might have been the one that Surfnslide did above. It must be in one of my walking books. Saw Stainforth force and Catrigg Force on it.

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