Anglezarke circular

A couple of weeks ago, on Saturday, I fancied another walk, but didnt feel like driving too far, so the obvious choice was to head over to the West Pennine Moors, only 20 minutes drive from home. I reckoned the peat would be dry so I worked out a route that included going “off piste”, keeping fingers crossed that I wouldn’t get bogged down!

I parked up at Rivington near the barns and set off at about 9 o’clock. It was grey and cloudy but sunshine was promised – although it arrived later than forecast.

I cut across to Rivington village and then through the field and by the brook, cutting up the path alongside Dean Wood Nature Reserve

up to the campsite at Wilcock’s farm.

I crossed the road and climbed over the stile and followed a less well used path onto the moor. After the dry weather he going was good, although it wouldn’t necessarily be like that in the winter.

I followed the path across the moor towards Old Rachel’s, one of a significant number on ruined farms on Anglezarke Moor. At one time people lived here. It must have been a bleak setting in winter, but it was a family home. However, the farms were bought and demolished by Liverpool Corporation after the Anglezarke and Rivington reservoirs were constructed, allegedly to protect the water supply.

On reaching Old Rachel’s I stopped for a while for a rest and to take in the views

DSC09066
Old Rachel’s today
and how it used to look (source Wikipedia)

and was treated to the sight of a large flock of lapwings flying overhead.

DSC09071

I carried on to Hempshaws and then on towards Horden Stoops.

There was only a mini-quagmire after Hempshaws – it’s usually very boggy here – which agured good for later in the walk. I got a close up view of a lapwing flying above the moor as I neared Horden Stoops.

Then I turned north following the path over Spitler’s and Redmond’s Edges over to Great Hill. The high cloud hadn’t cleared and there was a stiff breeze and I was glad I’d brought a fleece with me.

I climber to the summit of Great Hill and then stopped for a while in the shelter out of the wind for a bite to eat.

I descended down the path towards Drinkwaters but before I reached the ruin I took the path down towards another ruin, Great Hill Farm.

I doubled back along the Bottom of Great Hill towards the Edges,

getting close up views of a curlew. It flew over head a few times and then landed on the grass not far from the path. I must have been close to its nest. I tried to get a close up with my phone – this is the best I could do

Reaching the stile at the bottom of the path up to the top of Great Hill I turned onto the open moor and more or less followed a path over the pet heading towards Round Loaf. It was squidgy in a few places, and the path wasn’t always easy to trace, but it was generally OK.

There was plenty of bog cotton blooming

I stopped for a break on top of the tumulus

Winter Hill and Rivington Pike across the moor
Looking back to Great Hill

and then set off again across the peat towards Hurst Hill.

Looking back towards Round Loaf and Great Hill
The cairn on Hurst Hill

After enjoying the views for a while I headed down the path towards Moor Road.

Looking towards Healy Nab

Joining the road I walked along the tarmac for half a mile or so past Manor Farm

until I reached Jepson’s Gate where I took the path that headed back towards the moors.

The cloud had begun to disperse and is was getting hotter, especially in the sun.

I joined the path that cut across the fields towards Parson’s Bullogh and Allance Bridge.

The Yarrow at Allance Bridge

Reaching the road, I decided to walk back to Rivington beside the reservoirs so follwed the road a short distance before taking the path along Yarrow Reservoir.

Looking over Yarrow Reservoir towards the moors

I cut down the path down past the overflow (which, given the dry weather of late, wasn’t flowing) and then crossed the dam to join the path along the north side of Lower Rivington reservoir.

I crossed the dam between the two Rivington reservoirs stopping to watch the dingys sailing on the water of the Upper reservoir.

I follwed the the lake side path back to the Saxon barn and then up the road to my car.

The route

10 thoughts on “Anglezarke circular

  1. That’s a cracking round. You’ve more steam in you than I have at the moment. I was at Great Hill farm myself yesterday. It’s hard to say which is my favourite ruin on the moors. GH farm would be one, and Old Rachel’s would be another, Drinkwaters too for its location.

    • I think I’d agree with you. Drinkwaters has to be my all time favourite though. When I used to walk up to Great Hill with my school friends in my teens this is where we always stopped and made a brew And “wonder mush” (dehydrated mash) on our meths stove. A long time ago! Good memories. Always seems busy these days. Great Hill Farm and Old Rachel’s quieter and very evocative.

      • Yes, I sat down for lunch there and the sheep moved in, like they’re used to people with packed lunches and whatever they can scrounge or rob. I’ve had that on some of the more popular summits in the Lakes, but not on the moors before.

  2. Really must make the time to explore this area. I’ve come to know it “virtually” through your many lovely walks and need to see it for myself. Nice combination of water, moorland and evocative ruins

  3. What a dramatic sky you had for walking with the ghosts of long dead farms. I love curlews, their plaintive trilling calls are the sound of spring and summer for me. Don’t see many lapwings round here unfortunately, but your writing is persuading me to spend more time heading east rather than west from here in search of adventures.

    • The moors don’t have the rugged drama of the Lakes (but, then again, they’re not much different in character – albeit smaler – than the Dodds and parts of Skiddaw Forest) but they have a bleak wildness and having grown up nearby and with a view of Winter Hill from the window of my teenage bedroom, they’re in my blood!

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