Rannerdale Knotts

After drying out in the cafe and revitalising myself with some soup and cups of tea, I decided to brave the elements again. The weather was definitely picking up. The rain was much lighter, although the wind was still blowing. So what to do? I contemplated walking round Crummock Water, but I fancied getting up a bit higher. I ruled out climbing up any of the big fells due to the wind, so decided to climb the modest fell of Rannerdale Knotts.

A short distance from the village, just before the National Trust car park, I turned right just after a row of houses on to a path which climbed up towards Whiteless Pike. One of the locals was keeping an eye on me!

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The Pike wasn’t my destination (perhaps another day) but after a shortish, moderately steep climb up a grassy slope, my route veered off to the north, up towards the long ridge of Low Bank and Rannerdale Knotts. The rain had stopped and there was blue sky ahead. Much more promising than the morning!

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Looking down into the valley and the National Trust car park, with Mellbreak, on the other side of Crummock Water, in the distance.

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and looking back towards Buttermere

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I carried on along the grassy ridge, getting buffeted by a strong wind. It seemed to be flowing through the valley and then rising up and sweeping over the ridge. Other than that, it was fairly easy going.

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Looking over to the right there was Whiteless Pike

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and a little further to the north, the great bulk of Grasmoor, with some cloud still lingering on the summit.

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Getting nearer to the summit now and a little scrambling over rock required, but nothing serious.

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Reaching the summit, this was the view over Crummock Water with Loweswater a little further on in the distance.

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and looking back towards Buttermere.

The view over to Red Pike and High Stile the other side of Buttermere.

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The cloud had dispersed now from the top of Grasmoor (well, more or less) as the skies brightened.

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I could have descended now and walked back via the shores of Crummock Water, but I was enjoying being higher up and as the views towards Buttermere were so stunning I decided to turn round and retrace my steps along the ridge.

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Before descending back down to Buttermere I diverted slightly to have a look down Rannerdale itself with the Knotts dominating the left side of the pleasant valley. In the spring the sides of the valley are covered with a mass of bluebells. But not in October!

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At the end of the ridge, this was the view over towards Newlands Pass

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and beyond Haystacks the summit of Great Gable was beginning to emerge from the cloud.

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By the time I was back in Buttermere it had really brightened up

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I passed the small church of St James, where I’d sheltered from the downpour for a short while in the morning, on my way back to the hostel. Look at the blue sky!

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It was looking promising for Wednesday.

14 thoughts on “Rannerdale Knotts

  1. Rannerdale Knotts always looks extremely appealing on the map (and now in photos) but I’ve never done it. As I often seem to say on other people’s blogs – another one to add to my list 😀

    • It’s a good little half day walk with some options for variation. It was a good choice while the weather was beginning to improve. I believe the valley is particularly beautiful when the bluebells are out

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