Last day in Haarlem

Our flight home at the end of our short holiday didn’t leave Schipol until after 7 o’clock, so we had more a less a full day before we got the bus to the airport. I had a wander along the canal first thing before we had to leave our little house.

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We dropped our bags at our daughter’s work, went for a coffee and then had a wander round town, mooching round the pleasant shopping streets. There was a small market on in the Botermarkt

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After grabbing a bite to eat we decided to visit Sint Bavo, the Grote Kerk. We’d been inside before a couple of years ago but decided we’d like another look round. There’s an entry fee, but it’s quite reasonable.

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We caught the end of one of the regular organ recitals held in massive Gothic building. Installed in 1738, the organ is huge – it covers the whole west wall of the church and is almost 30 metres high. It’s something of a tourist attraction in it’s own right and has been played by Handel and Mozart.

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The floor of the church is covered with gravestones. We spotted the grave of Pieter Teyler, who left the money for the museum that bears his name.

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Afterwards we wandered down to the river to meet son and daughter by the windmill – they’d been spending the last afternoon together.

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We walked back to the Grote Markt and had a final drink (mint tea!) then it was time to pick up our bags and say goodbye.

We’d had a good little holiday in Haarlem and the weather had been kind – much better than we’d expected from the weather forecast we’d seen before we arrived. The week had just disappeared and it’s not easy to leave your daughter behind, even if she is grown up 😦 We’re planning to go back for Christmas – providing we can find somewhere suitable to stay. And now we’re just about coming to the end of summer that’s not so long off.

6 thoughts on “Last day in Haarlem

    • I guess it does,
      As you can see it’s a modern window. The “Red Riding Hood” is actually a cluster of flowers. One of the volunteer guides told us what the window was meant to portray. The objects in the bottom half are meant to represent the different religions of the world, all seperate and in conflict. The red cluster represents them coming together in peace…. or something to that effect

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