Art Deco London

Work is taking me down to London a few times during June and July. The first of three visits took place last week. I caught a train late Wednesday afternoon ready for a meeting the next day. It’s not much fun sitting in a budget hotel room near Euston, so I decided to get out for a wander around Bloomsbury and Fitzrovia.

London’s a different world from a northern town like Wigan. So much more hectic and busier and with a lot more activity and things to see even while just mooching about. I’m fairly familiar with Bloomsbury as you’re in the district as soon as you step outside Euston station, but, even so, I often spot something I’ve not noticed before while I’m out “street haunting”.

Bloomsbury and nearby Fitzrovia are noted for Georgian and Regency architecture. But in amongst the neo-Classical squares and crescents there are other types of buildings, including a few in the Art Deco / “Streamline Moderne” style from the 1930’s. Here’s a few photos – some I’d seen before but a few I’d noticed for the first time. The light wasn’t great for photos, unfortunately, but here’s a few snaps anyway.

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Block of flats on Coram Street, Bloomsbury
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Former Bentley Garage
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University College London, Senate House, off Russell Square
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The doorway of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
I sat my BOHS Certificate oral examination in this building many years ago
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This building on the Edgeware Road looks like it used to be a cinema
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Broadcasting House, the headquarters of the BBC, on the corner of Portland Place and Langham Place, Fitzrovia. The first radio broadcast from the building was made on 15 March 1932
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The sculpture of Prospero and Ariel  by Eric Gill on the facade of Broadcasting House.
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Middlesex House in Fitzrovia. A 5 storey office building erected in 1934 that was previously a garment factory
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Another view of Middlesex House

12 thoughts on “Art Deco London

  1. I love looking at buildings in and all over London. People trip over me trying to read a plaque, looking at an interesting addition to some building or give a look as if “oh my goodness, another bloody tourist.” I wonder if in the rush past they have ever noticed an interesting something.

    • Yes, it’s a fine example which is difficult to photograph. I agree about driving up the ramp. Mind, today’s cars would no doubt be too big to get up there!

  2. Some great images there, a couple of those buildings look like something from the old Eastern Bloc. Inspires me to look out the architecture when I head off on another city inspired holidays next week

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