Pike O’ Blisco and Crinkle Crags

The mini heatwave was over but the weather last Sunday was forecast to be quite decent up in the Lake District, so we set out early and headed up to Great Langdale. It took less than 2 hours to drive up the M6 and across to Dungeon Ghyll and we arrived by 10 o’clock giving a good long day. The plan was to climb Pike o’ Blisco then, depending on how we felt, tackle Crinkle Crags. This was an ambitious walk for us but after our adventure walking (most of!) St Cuthbert’s Trail we were keen to keep up with some relatively serious walking.

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We parked up on the National Trust Car Park near the Stickle Barn and the New Dungeon Ghyll Hotel. We booted up and set off through the fields, our objective, Pike o’ Blisco clearly visible.

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Getting a bit closer

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Looking over to Crinkle Crags across the meadow

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We had to walk along the narrow road that heads over to Little Langdale and the Wrynose Pass for a while. Looking back there was a good view of the Langdale Pikes and towards Bowfell and the Crinkles

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The start of the climb up to Pike o’ Blisco (2,313 feet)

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Looking back towards the Langdale Pikes. Skiddaw can be seen in the distance on the left and the Helvelyn range to the right.

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Initially it was a gradual, fairly steep, climb up a clear path which had been paved to prevent erosion (it’s a popular route)

The summit dead ahead

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Closing in on the rocky summit

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We had to tackle a few scrambles requiring the use of hands and feet

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We finally made the top. It was quite windy, but not so bad that it was unpleasant. Good visibility meant there were great views all around

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Looking across to Crinkle Crags and Bowfell

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The Coniston Fells

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Windermere in the distance

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We’d made reasonable time and were feeling good. Next objective Crinkle Crags, then!

Heading down towards Red Tarn

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After a long, but relatively easy, gradual climb up a grassy slope, we reached the first of the rocky “Crinkles”

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Crinkle Crags consists of a series of five rocky rises and depressions (crinkles): the second, “Long Top”, being the highest at 2818 feet. The ridge is about a mile long and crossing it involves several scrambles using hands as well as feet. Crossing it is well worth the effort, though, with magnificent views and a little excitement. According to Alfred Wainwright

For the mountaineer who prefers his mountains rough …this is a climb deserving of high priority

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The view down Great Langdale

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The “second Crinkle” . We decided to take the easier (a relative term!) route to the left, avoiding the “Bad Step”.

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Looking over to Scafell and Scafell Pike, England’s tallest mountains.

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Looks like we’re on the Moon!

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Looking back to Pike o’ Blisco with Windermere in the background

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Carrying on along the undulating ridge

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Looking towards Bowfell

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We reached the Three Tarns, with a final look over to the Scafells before we started ours descent back down towards Langdale

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We set off down the Band, a relatively easy descent down to the valley

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It was hard on the knees, though. I was glad of my walking poles.

Looking backwards to Crinkle Crags

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Pike o’ Blisco dead ahead

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The Langdale Pikes to our left

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The view down Great Langdale

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Some of the locals

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Looking back towards the Crinkles and The Band

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Crossing

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We passed the Old Dungeon Ghyll

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and carried on along the path for the last half a mile or so to the Stickle barn car park where we’d parked up

Feeling hungry, we decided to eat at Stickle barn before driving home

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Yummy – Herdwick Shepherd’s pie and  Herdie pulled lamb on a bun

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A side order of rather excellent sweet potato chips

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A proper brew!

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And a view of Lingmoor Fell while we ate.

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A long, butt very enjoyable day and a great walk.

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15 thoughts on “Pike O’ Blisco and Crinkle Crags

  1. You read my mind with the pictures of the food at the end. After all that tramping about I wondered what you ate to replace all the calories you burned. Do you bring a lunch with you? How many miles/km did you hike? So beautiful and inspirational as always.

    • Thanks Susanne 😉. This was about 8.5 miles on the map, about 12 taking account of the ups and downs. According to the pedometer on my phone about 30,000 steps – and they weren’t easy steps! I have to watch my food intake when I’m out walking. I’m an insulin dependant diabetic so have to ensure I keep topping up. We take sandwiches and fruit but I also take cereal bars and on a walk like this tend to have to eat one every 45 minutes to make sure my blood sugar doesn’t drop too low. We enjoyed the meal at the barn at the end – and a good mug of tea (with a tasty pint of local ale for my wife – unfortunately I can’t drink alcohol)

  2. I’d agree – definitely up there with the best. I’m half tempted to change my plans for the day!

  3. Pingback: Where Romans marched | Down by the Dougie

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