Kentmere Tarn circular

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The weather forecast for the last day of our break in the Lake District wasn’t promising and when I got up it was raining heavily. So time to chill out, relax and do some reading. However, by midday the rain had eased off so, despite the grey skies and low cloud up the valley, I decided to go out for a short walk. It ended up being a little longer than intended!

From the front windows of our cottage we could see the small tarn  a little way down the valley, so I decided to walk over and have a closer look.

The original Kentmere Tarn was a larger body of water that was drained in the 1830’s to provide reclaimed farm land, but it was of poor quality. However, deposits of diatomite, also known as diatomaceous earth, were found in the former lake bed – the only source of the material in the UK –  and were mined for use in the production of insulation products. The mine was originally owned by Kentmere Diatomite, an independent company which was taken over by Cape Insulation. The process involved drying off the earth in a kiln which burnt off the vegetable matter. The resultant powder was then mixed with several minerals including asbestos. Production finished in the 1970’s but the old insulation factory is still there, and is now used by a company manufacturing packaging. (There’s some good information about the diatomite mining in this document). The present Kentmere Tarn was formed due to the flooding of the workings.

I set out after midday. Visibility was poor down the valley due to the cloud and mist.

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I headed past Kentmere Hall and then set off down a muddy path toward the Tarn.

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15 minutes later I reached the Tarn. Access to the banks is restricted to fishermen and the path was a little way above the water line.

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After passing the Tarn the path goes through the factory yard – watch out for fork lift trucks!

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A little further along down a quiet lane, near confluence of the River Kent and Park Beck, there’s the old mill where Kentmere Pottery is now based

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The confluence of the two rivers

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Cutting inland along the path which heads up towards the moors

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I passed this old abandoned building. A shepherd’s hut?

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Heading further up towards the moor. Looked like there was some rain ahead.

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Good views, though, if a little misty.

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The path turned back down towards the valley

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Some sections of the route were very  “slutchy” (a Lancashire term for wet mud)

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Further along I got a good view down towards the Tarn

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and Kentmere village came into view

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The path back down to Kentmere Hall

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Heading back to the church, a nice, warm, dry cottage and a brew!

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