A walk along the Edges

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The last day of our short break in the Peak District we decided to go for a walk along the gritstone edges to the east of Baslow. We drove a few miles up to Curbar gap and parked up on the National Trust car park. It isn’t very large, so we were fortunate to find a space.

The plan was to walk along White Edge and then return along Froggat Edge and Curbar Edge. We ended up extending the walk by a few miles through the Longshaw Estate.

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Leaving the car park we took the path up to White Edge.

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After a short climb we were on top of the ridge where views opened up over desolate moorland – a lonely rugged landscape even though it’s only a few miles to Sheffield.

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The path was a bit boggy in places.

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Out on the wild and windy moor!

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Looking north over Froggat Edge we could see the Hope Valley ridge and Kinder Scout in the distance

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White Edge is an undulating ridge with a few gentle ups and downs, but relatively easy walking. On one of the “summits” we spotted this stone. Looking closely we could see that there were words carved into it. Being weathered, it was a little difficult to read at first but we soon worked out that it was a poem.

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There was a web address carved on the stone too and as the reception on my phone was quite good I had a quick look to find out more. It transpired that this is one of a series of “companion stones”

“Companion stones are a set of twelve matching stones. Designed by local poets and artists and created by sculptors and masons of the Peak, are a similar stature, volume and material as their compeers. Like the guide stoops, each bears an inscription pointing, not to market towns, but towards the future. In doing so, they draw attention to the moors, an indicator of the trick environmental terrain we have yet to navigate” http://www.companionstones.org.uk/

The project was inspired by the Guide Stoops which were erected in the early 18th century to help travellers across treacherous moors, each stoop providing directions to the nearest market town.  This stone had a poem by Mark Goodwin and was designed by Jo Dacombe

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(Poem by Mark Goodwin)

We carried on along the ridge, deciding to carry on towards Longshaw rather than cutting down to the Grouse Inn. We crossed the main road and set out along the path towards Longshaw Lodge

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The Longshaw Estate was once the Duke of Rutland’s shooting estate but was bought by the people of Sheffield in 1928, being passed on to the National Trust in1931. Today it’s a pleasant Country Park which seems to be well used by people from Sheffield and the vicinity as well as visitors like ourselves.

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We passed below a gritstone outcrop but couldn’t resist climbing up for the view. A rainbow could be seen to the north east.

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After a while the path went through some woodland

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before we arrived at Longshaw Lodge where there was a busy little café, so we stopped for a brew.

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The lodge was built about 1827 to provide a retreat for the Duke of Rutland’s shooting parties. I believe that it has now been converted into flats.

It was a clear day and there were good views towards  Higger Tor

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and Stannage Edge, the other side of Hathersage.

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Setting out again we walked through woodland and moorland back towards Froggat Edge. We spotted another Companion Stone, this one designed by Kate Genever

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with a poem by Ann Atkinson.

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Looking back

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we left the Estate and then walked a short distance along the road to the Grouse Inn. It looked quite busy and we didn’t need any refreshments so carried on cutting across the fields and through the NT carpark

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crossing the road and joining the path that climbed up to Froggat Edge, initially passing through pleasant woodland

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Looking back

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There’s a small ancient stone circle just off the footpath. It’s not exactly Stonehenge, but interesting none the less.

 

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Reaching the top of the ridge there were good views over the steep gritstone cliffs on the north side of the Edge

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Along with Curbar Edge tot he south, it’s a favourite spot for climbers.

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We carried along the ridge heading towards Curbar Edge

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Looking east we had a good view of White Edge that we’d walked along a few hours earlier

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We carried on along the ridge

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and descended down back to the car park. There was a rather upmarket mobile snack bar which was tempting,

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but we had decided to call in at the Chatsworth Farm Shop before heading home and it was getting close to closing time, so changed out of our boots and set off.

It had been a good walk. A lot easier than some we have done lately, but interesting nevertheless, with great views and a little culture too!

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