The NGV International, Melbourne

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The National Gallery of Victoria or “NGV”  in Melbourne is the oldest public art museum in Australia. It has to two sites – the NGV International, located on St Kilda Road in the and The Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia, located nearby as art of the Federation Square complex. During my stay in the city I was able to visit both Galleries, starting with the NGV International. As it’s name suggests it concentrates on works from outside Australia and has an extensive collection from Europe, Asia, America, and Oceania. There was a lot to see so this post is just a brief summary of some of the exhibits that particularly appealed to me.

Entrance to the building is to either side of the “wall of water”

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In the entrance hall there was a fairground roundabout – it was one of the temporary exhibits Golden Mirror Carousel by Carsten Höller

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Visitors could take a ride on the carousel but it wasn’t quite the thrilling experience they might have expected – it turned very slowly and apparently took about 4 minutes to complete a rotation.

Also on the ground floor behind the entrance hall is the Grand Hall with it’s massive stained glass ceiling (the world’s largest) by the Australian artist Leonard French

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From the Grand Hall I went through to the sculpture garden

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where there were works by Henry Moore

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and other artists including a cast of Balzac by Rodin

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Standing Figure (1969) by Willem de Kooning

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Noble Ape by Louise Paramor

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Grand parade with red background by Fernand Leger

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Back inside I skipped the temporary exhibition about Jean Paul Gaultier and concentrated on the permanent collection, particularly the more modern works

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Some favourites included Portrait of the painter Manuel Humbert by Modigliani

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1938 by Ben Nicholson

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Still life (1953) by Nicolas de Stael (I particularly liked this simple painting by an artist I’d not come across before this visit)

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There were also works by Francis Bacon, Bridget Riley

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Rothco

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Joan Mitchell and others

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There was an interesting collection of European decorative arts including some examples of Art Nouveau furniture

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works from the Bauhaus

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and furniture from a Vienna apartment by Adolf Loos

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I’m not a great fan of Victorian art, but did like two pieces by Edward Burne-Jones, this painting Baronne Madeleine Deslandes

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and this stained glass window originally from the Cheadle Royal Hospital in Manchester (now demolished)

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There was a good selection of works from China, India and other parts of the Far east, including this Reflection model (Itsukushima), 2013–14, by the Japanese artist Takahiro Iwasaki’s 15956416065_26cab5eafd_o

Unfortunately the gallery of other Japanese works was closed for reorganisation.

There was a small selection of contemporary works, including this one by Australian artist Mark Hilton. DSC02845

Finally, I took a look around the temporary exhibition of works by the British artist David Shrigley

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