Modern Art at Chatsworth

In the past the aristocracy acted as patrons of the arts, buying and commissioning works by contemporary artists and building large collections. The current Duke of Devonshire has continued this tradition. Walking through the gardens at Chatsworth we came across a number of modern works.

This couldn’t be by anyone else but Richard Long. The Cornwall Slate Line is imaginatively sited running parallel to the canal.

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There are several works by Elisabeth Frink. War Horse is appropriately sited in the stables courtyard.

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This is her Lying Down Horse

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Here’s a copy of one of her heads – I’ve seen a few other versions of this

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This is a bust of Elisabeth Frink, a tribute by fellow artist Angela Conner

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This Art Nouveau style gateway is in the hedge near the maze. I couldn’t find any information on it’s creator.

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This is unmistakeably by Barry Flanagan. The drummer – a version of which stands outside the entrance to the Irish Museum of Modern Art in Dublin.

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A site specific work by David Nash, made of charred wood – Forms that grow in the night.

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This is Dejeuner sur l’Herbe by the British sculptor, Allen Jones

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There’s modern art displayed in the public areas of the house too. ‘This is Saint Bartholomew, Exquisite Pain’ by Damien Hirst which is currently on semi-permanent display in Chatsworth’s sseventeenth century chapel. At first glance it looked as if it was contemporary to the chapel itself. But closer inspection revealed subtleties that gave the game away,such as the wooden table the statue is standing on.

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This is a piece by Anthony Caro.

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Another work by Alan Jones his life-size sculpture Carefree Man stands in front of Chinese Ladders by Felicity Aylieff . The form and design of this pot is inspired by the structure of bamboo scaffolding used by builders in China.

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One thought on “Modern Art at Chatsworth

  1. Pingback: Museum Van Loon | Down by the Dougie

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